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Charles Le Brun
Charles Le Brun

Charles Le Brun (24 February 1619, Paris – 22 February 1690, Paris) was a French painter and art theorist, engraver, architect, head of the French school of art under King Louis XIV of France.

In 1671 Le Brun became the director of the Royal Cabinet of Paintings, in fact, the first director of the Louvre. Governing personally both the Academy and industrial shops, Le Brun directly influenced the tastes and worldview of a whole generation of artists having become a major figure of the “Louis XIV style”. The king himself shared and encouraged the art of Le Brun, especially after holding the triumphal celebrations of 1660 and finishing the interiors of Vaux-le-Vicomte in 1661. Since 1662 Le Brun controlled all artistic orders of the court. He personally painted the halls of the Apollo Gallery in the Louvre, the interiors of the castle of Saint-Germain and Versailles (the War salon and the Peace Salon).

In his creative work Charles Le Brun combined possibilities of all the arts for the implementation of a common objective. He created a style that dominated for decades the culture and arts not only in France, but also in other European countries contributing to expand the arsenal of artistic means.